Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part Two

As mentioned in Part One of our series, the Government of Canada has been making some changes to the food labels and fact tables. Whether you are a consumer or part of the food and beverage industry, the amendments have changed the way labelling is written and read. 

While the entire process has been rolled out over the past couple of years, consumers have already noticed some changes across the country. As the creators of food packaging and labels, Great Little Box Company/Ideon Packaging (GLBC) wanted to explain some of the changes and how to understand the important information. 

In Part Two of our Three-Part Food Label Series, we will look at changes to the serving size, as well as what to expect in your packaging. 

Serving Size 

There are a few changes to expect when consumers are looking at serving size. The reason behind the changes in serving size was to better reflect the amount Canadians are eating in one sitting. The changes will make it easier to compare similar foods and to know how many calories and nutrients are being eaten. 

Single Serving 

  • A single-serve can be defined as the whole amount of the container 
  • Any liquids are a great example of something being “single serve.” 
  • The new regulations mean, for example, that the serving size on the label will cover the entire 250mL carton of milk 
New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices
New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Single Serving

 Multi-Serve 

Multi-serve packaging is anything that is coming in multiples, like crackers or cookies. The new changes have been implemented to make serving sizes more consistent for similar foods. There are 3 different ways you will see multiple serving sizes change on labels. 

 Measured 

  • Foods that can be measured will now reflect common household measurements like cup or tablespoon on the label 
  • An example is yogurt, shown with a common measurement like “1 cup.”
New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices - Measured
New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Measured

Divided 

  • Like crackers, the serving size will come as the number of pieces or as the fraction of food 
  • This makes it easy to compare to other boxes of crackers 
New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices - Divided
New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Divided

 Typically eaten 

  • Bread, for example, most only eat 1 or 2 slices in a single sitting 
  • This makes it easier to compare to different types of bread 

More information on the changes coming to food labels can be found on the Government of Canada –  Health Services webpage 

Be sure to stick around for Part Three of our blog series and as we discuss the changes for the ingredients list. In the meantime, feel free to reach out to our Label Division for any label updates on an existing product or for an upcoming project. 

 

Links to the entire Blog Series: 

Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part One

Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part Two

Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part Three

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