Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part Three

September 2, 2021

The Government of Canada has made some changes to the food labels and fact tables over the past couple of years. Whether you are a consumer or part of the food industry, the amendments have changed the way labels are written and read. 

Food Tables - New Labelling Requirements Part Three
Food Tables – New Labelling Requirements Part Three

While the entire process will be completed over the next couple of years, consumers have already noticed some changes across the country. As the creators of food packaging and labels, GLBC wanted to explain some of the changes coming and how to understand the important information. 

In Part 3 of our 3-Part Food Label Series, we look at the changes coming to the ingredients list, specifically looking at how sugars will be grouped and displayed. 

Sugar Information 

There will be two noticeable changes to information on sugars when it comes to labels. 

Nutrition Facts Table

Those looking at sugar on the Nutrition Facts Table will notice that the percent daily value for total sugar has been included. This will help consumers compare the sugar content of different foods and identify foods with access sugar that should be limited in the diet. 

Food Tables - New Labelling Requirements Part Three
Food Tables – New Labelling Requirements Part Three

Anything with a sugar value of 15% or more should be limited. 

List of Ingredients 

Sugar-based ingredients will now be grouped together to help consumers see the sugars that have been added to food, find the source of sugars, and understand how much sugar is added compared to other ingredients. 

Food Tables - New Labelling Requirements Part Three
Food Tables – New Labelling Requirements Part Three

Sugars can include: 

  • White sugar, beet sugar, raw sugar or brown sugar 
  • Agave syrup, honey, maple syrup, barley malt extract or fancy molasses 
  • Fructose, glucose, glucose-fructose (also known as high fructose corn syrup), maltose, sucrose or dextrose 
  • Fruit juice concentrates and purées concentrates that are added to replace sugars in foods 

To learn more about the changes to Canadian food labels, visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-labelling-changes.html  

We hope our three-part series has helped you with all of the label changes that have occurred in the past couple of years. If you are looking to update your labels for an existing product, or perhaps have a new label project on the go, contact our Label Division. 

 

Links to the entire Blog Series: 

Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part One

Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part Two

Changing the Food Tables: New Labelling Requirements to Help Consumers Make Informed Food Choices – Part Three

 

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